Amy Cutler: Fossa, Braiding Women Together

•May 24, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Posted by Dorothy Lander

Hair as burden and focus for women’s collaboration in Amy Cutler’s Fossa.

An article by Kerry Gaertner Gerbracht on May 23, 201 for Hyperallergic

http://hyperallergic.com/300536/a-community-of-women-bound-together-by-braids/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Kids%20Smash%20Art%20at%20Glass%20Museum%20While%20Adults%20Stand%20by%20Filming&utm_content=Kids%20Smash%20Art%20at%20Glass%20Museum%20While%20Adults%20Stand%20by%20Filming+CID_541085547f8ab73eec81b53e069829fb&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=A%20Community%20of%20Women%20Bound%20Together%20by%20Braids

Fossa” itself is a collaboration among women, Amy Cutler’s first. She worked with her longtime friend, the musician Emily Wells, and the hair stylist Adriana Papaleo to create the work for a SITE Santa Fe commission last year. Cutler wanted Wells and Papaleo to have complete freedom to do what they wanted for the project, but did ask each to read two books for inspiration: a book of theKinsey brothers’ photographs of early 20 century loggers in the Pacific Northwest and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s 1915 novel Herland, an early feminist utopian tale of an isolated society of women who reproduce through parthogenisis. Together, the trio arrived at the theme of concealed burden, which is often present throughout Cutler’s solo work.

Amy-CutlerFossa Braids 2016 Installation

Marina Bychkova, Maker of Enchanted Dolls

•April 15, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Posted by Dorothy Lander

Bychkova Marina pregnant enchanted doll

SPECIMEN: From Marina Bychkova’s Galleries:

http://www.enchanteddoll.com/galleries1/#all

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/arts/exhibitionists/canadian-artist-enchanted-dolls-marina-bychkova-1.3534528

Vancouver Artist Marina Bychkova has been making dolls since a child.  She juxtaposes the nudity of the doll with taboo subjects, such as sexuality,or pregnancy, in the case of SPECIMEN shown above.   Her dolls call us to examine shame about women’s bodies and to express our outrage. If we are disturbed by her dolls, she calls us to question why, that is, to reflect critically on our own values and assumptions. And so it is she takes her rightful place on this site with popular educators who use their art for social justice.

Tune into CBC News Arts segment on Sunday, April 17, 2016 to watch a 5 minute special on Marina Bychkova’s Enchanted Dolls.

Mercedes Grundy with filmmaker Lisa Wu have made a short feature, which will air on the show Exhibitionists this Sunday at 4:30 PM.The video can also be seen on CBC’s website .

This feature contains a surprise appearance of  Marina’s most recent and secret new doll Madame de Pompadour.

Zoë Buckman’s Lingerie Feminism 2016 in LA

•March 28, 2016 • Leave a Comment

http://www.wmagazine.com/culture/art-and-design/2016/03/armor-zoe-buckmans-lingerie-feminism/

Zoe Buckman Lingerie Feminism Every Curve installation 2016 LA

Under Armor: Zoë Buckman’s Lingerie Feminism

The artist reveals her latest works in L.A., at Papillon Gallery.

Every Curve, as Buckman’s installation is called, explores the tension between the misogyny within rap and the positive, feminist messages she extracted from some of the music. She points to a nude bodysuit from the ’50s stitched in red thread with the lyrics: since a man can’t make one, he has no right to tell a woman when and where to create one.

 

Florence Nightingale & the Art of Data Visualization

•March 28, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Florence Nightingale art quote psh

Nursing education often cites Florence Nightingale to emphasize that nursing is an art form.  But a lesser known of her art forms is her visualizations of health data. Read on to see what is perhaps the original health infographic, as posted on Open Culture.

Watch Florence Nightingale and the Joy of Stats on YouTube

 

By the time Nightingale left Turkey after the end of the Crimean War in July 1856, the hospitals were well-run and efficient, with mortality rates no greater than civilian hospitals in England.” But feeling great regret over all the lives lost there to preventable disease, she went on to save even more of them by bringing numbers into play. She counted the dead!!  Specifically, she  compiled “vast tables of statistics about how many people had died, where and why. Many of her findings shocked her. For example, she discovered that in peacetime, soldiers in England died at twice the rate of civilians — even though they were young men in their primes.”

FLorence Nightingale mortality infographic

 

http://www.openculture.com/2016/03/florence-nightingale-created-revolutionary-visualizations-of-statistics-that-saved-lives-1855.html