Book: How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran, just released in the US

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How to boldly wear, do and write whatever you want while dealing with the traumas of growing up female and the burdens of others’ expectations is the premise of “How to Be a Woman,”  Caitlin Moran’srunaway hit in Britain that has just been released in the United States. Part memoir, part philosophical rant, part manifesto written with the lightest touch, the book aims to make women proud of being feminists, Moran said, and “to show how all the lessons I’ve learned actually make some progress.”

Excerpted from the New York Times, see:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/15/magazine/caitlin-moran-congratulations-youre-a-feminist.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120715

CAITLIN MORAN: ‘CONGRATULATIONS, YOU’RE A FEMINIST!’

By Sarah Lyall, July 12, 2012

Caitlin Moran has a fantasy of the night she and her sister Caz win an Academy Award for the film adaptation of her book “How to Be a Woman” ( . . . ) How to boldly wear, do and write whatever you want while dealing with the traumas of growing up female and the burdens of others’ expectations is the premise of “How to Be a Woman,” a runaway hit in Britain that has just been released in the United States. Part memoir, part philosophical rant, part manifesto written with the lightest touch, the book aims to make women proud of being feminists, Moran said, and “to show how all the lessons I’ve learned actually make some progress.” The wide range of topics covered include menstruation, sexism at work, the writing of Germaine Greer, cruddy boyfriends and how it doesn’t matter if your breasts sag because the only people likely to see them “are going to approach them in an attitude of immense gratefulness, i.e., hungry children and men who are about to get laid.” The book begins in Wolverhampton, England, 24 years ago, on Moran’s 13th birthday. “I am 13 stone” (182 pounds), she writes. “I have no money, no friends, and boys throw gravel at me when they see me.” But this is no misery memoir, despite its obvious miseries, including a childhood featuring eight children (Moran was the oldest) chaotically crammed together in public housing ( . . . )

As a child, she haunted the library, read about a book a day, mostly the autobiographies of writers ( . . . ) Her break came in the form of a winning essay in a national writing competition, which in turn gave her a summer column in The Observer newspaper at 15. Two years later, she began working for The Times of London, where she has been a columnist, critic and feature writer ever since. Now 37, she has a cultlike following ( . . . )  Interviewed at her home in North London, Moran talked the way she writes — fast, hyperbolic, cheery, filled with swear words ( . . . ) The word “feminism,” Moran said, has for some reason gone off the rails to connote, incorrectly, preachy humorlessness and grim separatism. “When I talk to girls, they go, ‘I’m not a feminist,’ ” she said. “And I say: ‘What? You don’t want to vote? Do you want to be owned by your husband? Do you want your money from your job to go into his bank account? If you were raped, do you still want that to be a crime? Congratulations: you are a feminist’ ” ( . . . )

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~ by artpoped on July 17, 2012.

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