Filmmaker Diana Saqeb Leads Women’s Rights Protest in Afghanistan, April 2009

Of interest to this blog,  note in this news item from The Times Online (UK) of April 30, 2009, that art and literature  fills the Kabul home of protest leader and filmmaker Diana Saqeb.  It strikes me that, to use Saqeb’s own words, is that she leads protest art that challenges people to “dare to doubt what they are told.”  Note also the blog response that challenges the journalist’s claim that this was the first public women’s rights protest since the 1970s. RAWA (Revolutionary Association of Women of Afghanistan www.rawa.org) has been the public protest voice of women since 1977. 

– Dorothy Lander

(copied from The Times On Line)

diana-saqeb_534459a

Defying threats, fighting oppression: the woman leading protests in Afghanistan

by  Tom Coghlan in Kabulcapital, Kabul, Ms Saqeb was present this week when President Karzai promised activists that there would be changes to the Shia Family Law that prompted their protest.

They were stoned, spat on and assaulted, but when 200 women staged
Afghanistan’s first public women’s rights protest<http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article6098614.ece
since the 1970s their voices were heard around the world.

And if centuries-old traditions are to change, it may well be a petite but pugnacious 28-year-old called Diana Saqeb who is responsible.

One of the organisers of the march, which took place a fortnight ago in the capital, Kabul, Ms Saqeb was present this week when President Karzai promised activists that there would be changes to the Shia Family Law that prompted their protest. One of the organizers of the march, which took place a fortnight ago in the capital, Kabul, Ms. Sqaeb was present this week when President Karze promised activists that there would be changes to the Shia Family Lw that prompter their protest.

Mr Karzai said that the legislation would be amended and he did not know that the law he was signing legalised marital rape, child marriage and a host of Taleban-era restrictions on women, because his advisers had failed to inform him of its contents.

Sitting in her home in Kabul, where the walls are lined with arthouse film posters and translations of Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Virginia Woolf and Michel Foucault, Ms Saqeb was unimpressed.

“This excuse is worse than the actual crime,” she said. “It was not acceptable for a lot of women present at the meeting that the first person of the country signs a law, which directly affects the lives of the people,
without reading it.”…

Ms. Saqeb said that the campiagn to change the Shia family legislation was just the start. “We are just confronting poeple who don’t dare to doubt what they are told.”

whole article online at:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article6194872.ece

Advertisements

~ by artpoped on May 2, 2009.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: